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CurtKnap
Thanks Valerij!
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SDGS
Could someone identify this coral for me please, the only information I can give you is I'm afraid is that it is from the the Wenlock Limestone Formation. 

 
5ec1a6a283439_unknownUKWenlockseriesfossil4b.08da689cfd8b3830db90b7781.jpg 
5ec1a6a45a1cc_unknownUKWenlockseriesfossil4c.76fedb1c215fb6f6ea12b8a8f.jpg 
5ec1a6a6958b3_unknownUKWenlockseriesfossil4e.thumb.9a440ab2a2b33dd3cf9.jpg 
5ec1a6a8632aa_unknownUKWenlockseriesfossil4f.8920b98deb08aaa2dac2b0759.jpg
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CurtKnap
Hi SDGS. Not got a lot of time at the moment, despite the COVID situation, but this just caught my eye when I signed on this morning. Looks like typical Wenlock LS material. On first glance, it's probably Dokophyllum sp. (used to be called Ketophyllum sp.). Thanks.
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SDGS
Thank you very much indeed CurtKnap for sparing me some of your time as I really appreciate that. I've noted your probable I. D. to this find, I've quite a few to add to this thread. If you should get the time to look at a few on the odd occasion that would be great. 
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SDGS
@CurtKnap would you have a suggestion as to help remove some of the limestone matrix please from these Wenlock corals. Bearing in mind I've no air tools.
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CurtKnap
Nice one Bobo - naturally prepared too!

SDGS - the only real options are mechanical removal (i.e. air tools or engraving tool) or chemical (i.e. acid for limestone). Mechanical removal with tools for corals, which are preserved as calcite in the limestone, does not usually produce good results and in my experience is not worth the effort. The problem with acid is that it dissolves the coral as well as the limestone. I tried many years ago using very weak acid (clear Sarsens vinegar will do) and it will certainly remove some limestone, but you end up with the surface of the coral gone too. If you really want to try, I suggest doing a test with a small, low-grade specimen to get a feel for what the results are.

Hope this helps.
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SDGS
Thank you for your reply, I understand what you mean, you would think as they feel quite sturdy when held they are quite fragile with any attempt to clean them up. I think I'll just leave them as they are and enjoy them in there “as found” form.

Could you please help us with some descriptions with these Wenlock limestone corals below.

Unknown fossil 1a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 5a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 1b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 5b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 1c view 3
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 5c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 1d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 5d.jpg

Unknown fossil 2a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 6a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 2b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 6b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 2c view 3
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 6c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 2d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 6d.jpg 


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Dirty Pete
Hi, 
#1 Maybe a not so well preserved Heliolites interstinctus........
helio.jpg 

Pete

Weird, seems to be a delay between pics showing up.....?

How about Favosites with a solitary coral growing on it for #2.
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CurtKnap
I'd go along with those IDs, Pete. Could be a small crinoid section on the Favosites, rather than another coral.
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SDGS
@Dirty Pete @CurtKnap thank you both, notes now added to fossils. A few more to add if that's OK.
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SDGS
Unknown fossil 3a view 1

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 7a - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 3b view 2

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 7b - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 3c view 3

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 7c - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 3d view 4

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 7d - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 3e view 5

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 7e - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 4a view 1

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 8a - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 4b view 2

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 8b - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 4c view 3

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 8c - Copy.jpg 

Unknown fossil 5a view 1

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 9a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 5b view 2

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 9b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 5c view 3

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 9c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 5d view 4

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 9d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 6a view 1

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 10a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 6b view 2

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 10b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 6c view 3

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 10c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 6d view 4

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 10d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 7a view 1 : focusing on the feature indicated with the white arrow. 

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 11a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 7b view 2

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 11b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 7c view 3

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 11c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 7d view 4

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 11d.jpg 

This one below I've been told is from Much Wenlock, excuse my blurred photos .

Much Wenlock Shropshire 1a.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 1b.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 1c.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 1d.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 1e.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 1f.jpg   Click image for larger version - Name: unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 7f - Copy.jpg, Views: 7, Size: 138.19 KB
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Dirty Pete
I'll go for Favosites again for #3, I can't see any corallites in #4 so I'll go for some kind of Stromatoporoid...
More Heliolites and the last one Thamnopora maybe. Not sure what the arrows pointing to.
Pete.
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CurtKnap
Hello again SDGS,

A nice selection there. Pete's got most of them...this is what I reckon:
3. Favosites sp.
4. Stromatoporoid
5. Propora tubulata
6.
Heliolites sp.
7. 
Unknown bryozoan on Alveolites sp. coral

The last one could well be Thamnopora as Pete says and is likely a bryozoan rather than a coral.

We do have a bryozoan expert on the forum (@polyfenestella).

Thanks.
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SDGS
@CurtKnap  @Dirty Pete thank you once again, its great to get some much needed advice with this material. I never realised how complicated it could be, I'm more of a middle Jurassic person. So these type of fossils are a real challenge for me. I know the @polyfenestella you mention and has been a huge help to me over the past year or so will be interesting to hear what he may think with the possible Thamnopora.

Darren. 
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CurtKnap
You're welcome, Darren.
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SDGS
Here's a couple more with the first being a bit tricky to photograph, so I've tried to pick out a few features that may help with an I.d. I like this coral due to its colour as I've not seen that before and it has a certain weight to it when held.

Unknown fossil 12a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 12a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 12 b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 12b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 12c view 3 Base attachment 

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 12c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 12d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 12d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 12e view 5
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 12e.jpg 

Unknown fossil 12f view 6
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 12f.jpg 

Unknown fossil 13a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 13a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 13b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 13b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 13c view 3
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 13c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 13d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 13d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 13e view 5
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 13e.jpg 

Unknown fossil 13f view 6
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 13f.jpg 
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CurtKnap
Hi Darren.

12 looks like a Favositella sp.

Can't see any distinguishing surface detail on 13 to ID a coral, but the form and view 3 suggests another Stromatoporoid.

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SDGS
@CurtKnap  Adrian, has now described this one as being 
Stromatoporoid Labechia.
Much Wenlock Shropshire 2a.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 2b.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 2c.jpg 

Much Wenlock Shropshire 2d.jpg
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CurtKnap
I think you are right there.

Did you know that Adrian (polyfenestella) has a thread called 'Silurian Bryozoa'?

I suggest posting these pics on there, which should trigger a message to Adrian...
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SDGS
Thank you looking @CurtKnap I will run the find by Adrian, would you have the time look at these please. 

Unknown fossil 14a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 14a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 14b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 14b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 14c view 3
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 14d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 14d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 14i.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15c view 3
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15e view 5
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15e.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15f view 6
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15f.jpg 

Unknown fossil 15g view 7
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 15g.jpg 

Unknown fossil 16a view 1
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 16a.jpg 

Unknown fossil 16b view 2
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 16b.jpg 

Unknown fossil 16c view 3
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 16c.jpg 

Unknown fossil 16d view 4
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 16d.jpg 

Unknown fossil 16e view 5
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 16e.jpg 

Unknown fossil 16f view 6
unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 16f.jpg 




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Bobo the bear
Silurian coral I think Favosites around 3 cm long but found at Filey. Only really  when defined when wet.
Click image for larger version - Name: SAM_1952.jpg, Views: 11, Size: 210.82 KB
Bobothebear
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CurtKnap
Bobo - does look like a very worn Favosites sp.; presumably a glacial erratic.

SDGS:
14 - can't see much close-up detail, but 14c suggests probably Favosites sp.
15 - looks like a random nodule with a coral 'mash-up' at one end. A section through the coral end would reveal more (the internal structure is often more diagnostic for palaeozoic corals).
16 - another Heliolites sp. A bit worn; the holes are possibly mollusc burrows. Another interesting feature of this specimen is that it looks like the juvenile coral started growing on a shell fragment (possibly trilobite). 
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SDGS
Thank you @CurtKnap Im learning all the time, especially with the  Heliolites sp as it's a real "to talk about" piece around the table. 

All information noted.
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SDGS
@CurtKnap I can't find any coral on the Internet resembling this find, any suggestions please.

View 1
unknown fossil 22a_compress87.jpg 

View 2
unknown fossil 22b_compress45.jpg 

View 3
unknown fossil 22f_compress41.jpg 

View 4
unknown fossil 22e_compress39.jpg 

View 5
unknown fossil 22c_compress48.jpg 

View 6
unknown fossil 22d_compress24.jpg 
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CurtKnap
Hi SDGS. It looks like another Favosites sp. to me.

Views 1 & 2 show a small bryozoan on the underside too.

The radiating pattern I think is the imprint of a bivalve shell on which the coral initially grew. Note the curved profile, similar to that of a modern pecten shell. I know little about Silurian bivalves, which are much rarer than brachiopods, but have found several internal casts over the years similar to that shown in your pics.
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SDGS
Thank you again @CurtKnap, it really is a photogenic fossil with lots of detail. I must admit I don't think I've a silurian bivalve in my collection. But I'll have to take a look now. I'll try and found out what the bryozoan may be. 
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SDGS
@CurtKnap could you I. D. this one please.

OI000388.jpg 

OI000387.jpg 

OI000389.jpg 

OI000390.jpg 
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CurtKnap
Hi SDGS.

The main fossil is a nice little Favosites sp. The attached rings are indeterminate crinoid ossicles (small sections of stem). The slightly raised one may be where a crinoid attached as there are suggestions of a holdfast, but this could also be coral growth around the crinoid stem (difficult to be sure without cleaning).
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SDGS
@CurtKnap Once again, thank you for taking some time out to run a rule over this find. Apart from the unusual looking golf ball shape (as my family comment on it). It’s certainly in my top 5 most intriguing Silurian fossils. 

I'm always trying to chase the light for a good photograph, so took my chance with this one as I was especially focusing on the interesting pattern. Would you have any suggestions as to what it may be please.

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 22b.jpg 

unknown UK Wenlock series fossil 22a.jpg
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CurtKnap
I would say it's a Palaeocyclus porpita, commonly known as a 'button coral'.

Even though obviously degraded, it's a nice find as these are relatively uncommon. A nice little association piece too, with a small brachiopod and trilobite pygidium just above it.
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SDGS
@CurtKnap thank you again, with a macro lens to hand you find yourself scouring over these finds for our hours on end. All noted and information added to this piece.
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SDGS
@CurtKnap these are perhaps a little to weathered to get a reasonable I.D. Would I be right in saying that they are associated and not separate corals.

unknown coral.jpg 

unknown corals.jpg 
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CurtKnap
Hi SDGS.

Nice little specimen. The form suggests the three individuals are associated to me - probably offsets on an Entelophyllum sp. There are some examples earlier in this thread.

Having looked again at the previous button coral I originally identified as Palaeocyclus porpita, I think it is more likely to be Rhabdocyclus sp. Palaeocyclus has a flatter, discoid form.
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Dirty Pete
Hi SDGS,
I remember one like that caused a long debate on a Wenlock thread on here.....coral or calyx?
Took a word from you know who to sort it out. Very nice coral it was too...
DSC05124_reduced.jpg 
Might be worth trying to dig yours out....

Pete.
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SDGS
CurtKnap wrote:
Hi SDGS.

Nice little specimen. The form suggests the three individuals are associated to me - probably offsets on an Entelophyllum sp. There are some examples earlier in this thread.

Having looked again at the previous button coral I originally identified as Palaeocyclus porpita, I think it is more likely to be Rhabdocyclus sp. Palaeocyclus has a flatter, discoid form.


Thank you CurtKnap all noted.
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SDGS
Dirty Pete wrote:
Hi SDGS,
I remember one like that caused a long debate on a Wenlock thread on here.....coral or calyx?
Took a word from you know who to sort it out. Very nice coral it was too...
DSC05124_reduced.jpg 
Might be worth trying to dig yours out....

Pete.


Hi Pete,

There is certainly a likeness.
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SDGS
@CurtKnap I thought I spotted another bivalve but I'm not convinced to be honest. It's probably part of the coral itself.

 Much Wenlock 3a.jpg 

Much Wenlock 3b.jpg 

Much Wenlock 3c.jpg 

Much Wenlock 3d.jpg 

Much Wenlock 3e.jpg 
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CurtKnap
Hi SDGS

It is indeed the septa of a coral rather than the ribs of a bivalve. The coral looks like Dokophyllum turbinatum; another nice find.
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SDGS
Thank you for the possible i.d. @CurtKnap this find has made it to my main fossil display. While cleaning out some old Ice Age bone draws, for some reason I left this coral in one of the draws. Again I've no idea what type of coral it is I'm afraid. But I'm sure I've described it before. 

unknown coral 1a.jpg 

unknown coral 1b.jpg 

unknown coral 1c.jpg 

unknown coral 1d.jpg 

unknown coral 1e.jpg 

unknown coral 1f.jpg 

unknown coral 1g.jpg 

unknown coral 1h.jpg 

unknown coral 1i.jpg
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CurtKnap
It's a Thecia sp. with lovely surface detail. I was sure I'd seen this exact same coral on another forum some time ago and have tracked it down to here:

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/72621-having-great-fun-with-a-book-published-in-1850/
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SDGS
That's brilliant @CurtKnap and posted in March 2017, no wonder I couldn't find where I put it, let alone what the coral was. I'm still looking through some draws so bound to find a few more. 
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