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Fossil hunter
Hi everyone,
I made a visit to hunt cliff last weekend. I walked from Skinningrove along the beach.
I did not find much but the view was beautiful. I would have to visit several times to get an eye for
where to look. I split open some nodules which I extracted from the shale bed but all of them seemed to contain nothing. Maybe I was looking at the wrong places for the nodules
There were plenty of the usual bivalves and belemnites packed in the seams.
I only managed to find a little ammonite this time(any idea for ID?) and here's the pics.

The view from Skinningrove towards Huntcliff
Skinningrove_to_Huntcliff.JPG 
Boulders covering the lower lias shales
Huntcliff01.JPG 
Ammonite negatives(Arietites geometricus?)
[attach:fileid=uploads/1195/Ammonite_negatives.JPG]
Ammonite(Arietites geometricus?) and bivalves(Plagiostoma striatum)
[attach:fileid=uploads/1195/ammonite_and_Plagiostoma_sp.JPG]

Thanks for watching!
Fossil hunter

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Fossil hunter
Visited Skinningrove today to see if I could find any lower or middle lias fossils.
In the 'Illustrations of the geology of Yorkshire' it says 'The marlstone(ie middle lias) may be well examined on the shore from the boiling-houses of the Rockcliff works to Skinningrove,for there the masses of this rock abound,and will richly reward the researches of the industrious collector'.
However it was not that productive since the tide was not ideal and seaweed was covering the most of the boulders. 
Here are the pictures of Skinningrove and today's find.
Skinningrove02.JPG 

Skinningrove01.JPG 

Gryphea_sp.JPG 
Gryphea sp?

Pricatula_spinosa.JPG 
Pricatula spinosa

Dentalium_giganteum.JPG 
Bivalves and Dentalium sp

Protocardia_truncata.JPG 
Protocardia truncata

Bivalves01.JPG 
Concentration of bivalves and belemnites

Bivalves02.JPG 
Another concentration of bivalves

Ripple_marks.JPG 
Ripple marks shown on a boulder.

Has anyone ever been to Hunt cliff to collect lower Lias fossils? I am interested to hear any experiences or finds around this area.

Thanks for watching!
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rocktapper


Hi fossil hunter.
My mate found a nearly complete 12' ichthyosaur in the the lower lias below Huntcliff(which was in the local paper) a few years ago and recently spotted the tail of another one. Also,if you examine the slate beds you can find ammonites and pinnas etc.
 
Cheers
 Mark
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Fossil hunter
Hi, rocktapper.
Thanks for sharing your experience.
Wow, finding a complete ichthyosaur must be quite exciting! 
I thought the ichthyosaurs were more common in the upper lias so that's a nice surprise.
I would try fossil hunting at Huntcliff one day and post a report of any findings there.
Regards,
Fossilhunter 
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rocktapper


Fossil hunter, theres also bone material to be found from the lower lias at Redcar.  You're right though,most bone does come from the upper lias. There is a partial ichthyosaur in a septarian nodule at Hummersea which is just south of Skinningrove.
 
Cheers
  Mark
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Fossil hunter
Hi rocktapper,
Thanks for the information. I will look forward visiting the places that you have recommended.
I have checked Hummersea on google map. Are there any passages from the cliff top down to the
shore? or do you have to walk from Skinningrove?
I was also considering to visit Boulby as well but I am not sure if there are any passages down to the shore there. Boulby cliff has the Redcar mudstone(lower lias) and Staithes sandstone(middle lias) exposed so I am thinking it's worth a visit.
Regards,
Fossil hunter
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fossils-uk
Parking at hummersea farm for skinninggrove, hummersea and boulby is a good bet. there is a way down the beach at hummersea farm then walk back south to boulby. remember thou the way on is the way off thou. 
byron 
fossils-uk, whitby
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Fossil hunter
Hi Byron
Thanks for your advise. I would make sure of the tide conditions when accessing these sites.
Regards,
Fossil hunter 
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Bow1980
Is this the tail you mention?














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Bow1980
Schoolboy error
 

 

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Fossil hunter
Hi Bow1980,
Wow! That's a nice Ichthy vertebral column!!
Did you find other parts of this individual? or is it only the tail that's exposed?
Fossil hunter
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rocktapper


Hi Bow,no ,thats the tail section of the 12 footer - the rest of it including the skull was under the slate. The other tail section is in the 'Penny Hole' area.
 
Fossil Hunter,beware - there are a couple of really nasty cut-off points to the north and south of Boulby
 
Cheers
  Mark
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Fossil hunter
Hi Mark,
I read about the local news of the 12footer. Has the 12 footer been extracted by the museum already or is it just being left there as it is? 
If it is a complete specimen I hope some museums would fund a excavation of it and exhibit it for public viewing.
I would be extra careful when going to Boulby for fossil hunting.
Regards,
Fossil hunter
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spider
Very nice photo, its great to see this material as found Thumbs Up
Have a nice day :0)
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rocktapper
Hi Fossil Hunter


The front end of the specimen was collected by a local geology group. Believe it or not they left the tail section that was showing. My mate( who found it in the first place)collected the tail section and still has it .


Cheers
  Mark
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Fossil hunter
Hi Mark,
I see. It's good to hear that but yes it's strange to leave only the tail section there.
Fossil hunter
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Naze Dave
Hang on, do i have this right? One group collected the front half and left the rest, another collector has the back half? Thats madness.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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rocktapper
Hi Dave, i agree - madness. Theres a photo on the net somewhere which shows the tail section in situ and big empty hole in front of it where it was dug out. Big shame as the specimen was articulated
 

Cheers

  Mark
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ryanc
rocktapper wrote:
Hi Dave, i agree - madness. Theres a photo on the net somewhere which shows the tail section in situ and big empty hole in front of it where it was dug out. Big shame as the specimen was articulated


 

It boggles the mind - what on earth could have stopped them from recovering the specimen entire - surely there's a moral duty to remove the whole thing or leave it for someone who can?

 

I wonder what the geology group say about it?
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Phileas fossilis
Total madness! Is that the specimen where the head was missing featured in Fossil Detectives on the BBC? they called it 'a cautionary tale'. I assumed it must have been a rogue collector rather than 'a geology group'.
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fossils-uk
yes it is always presumed that professional or rogue collectors did it when in fact it wasnt. :-(

fossils-uk, whitby
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Fossil hunter
It's a shame the geology group did not collect the specimen as a whole.
I am wondering whether it is properly prepared as well... I hope it is not stack somewhere with
dust gathering on it.
Fossil hunter
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Naze Dave
Surely a geology group would have the sense to leave it and notify a museum if they werent capable of removing it, this just sounds like a real shame and a poor example to set.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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