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All were heterodonty, but the alveoli gave appearance of single rooted teeth. It's hard to explain without pics. Try looking up dentary bones of morganonucodon, South Wales. Then you will see what I mean.
Byron
fossils-uk, whitby
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quagga
Hi,
whilst sieving Wadhurst clay samples this fragmentary dentary turned up.

Labial view:
dentary-labial.jpg 
Lingual view:
dentary-lingual.jpg 
Occlusal view:
dentary-occlusal.jpg 
The bone fragment is only 9mm long, and 3mm deep.
I am guessing small croc.  Any suggestions?
Al
Time is nature's way of stopping everything happening at once.
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fossils-uk
Looks suspiciously like a small mammal jaw to me. Very similar to the ones I used to find in the Triassic infills in South Wales when doing my university work.
fossils-uk, whitby
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quagga
Thanks fossils-uk,
I have yet to find any mammal teeth in the samples I have been sieving. I have been finding hybodont sharks, crocodylians, fish teeth and a couple of pterosaur teeth.  The croc teeth are mostly small, being either Theriosuchus sp. or 'Bernissartia'.  I had ruled out mammal on the basis of the homodont appearance.  All the alveoli appear to be from single rooted teeth.
Were the mammal remains you were finding of this nature, or did they display some degree of heterodonty?

regards
Al
Time is nature's way of stopping everything happening at once.
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