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Bill G
It could be some sort of echinoid Richard, though it would then be an interambulacrum, and they are the wide sections between the ambulacra.
 

It slightly reminds me of the following, though mine is a starfish arm from the Eocene, London Clay.

 

Starfish._Partial.jpg 

 

 
Cheers, Bill
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scousemouse
File0002.JPG 

I found this block of stone at Swanage, what made me pick it up is the very small line of what I thought might be teeth.  Surly is a fossil for the line to be so uniform, they are all the same height.  I also don't even though what the piece above is.  Any ideas?
Edited by Bill G 2011-05-22 21:04:10
ScouseMouse
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rab7ies
im not expert but the line of bumps looks like a trilobite part?
down amongst the stones.
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rab7ies
and the bit above...part of the head bit?
down amongst the stones.
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scousemouse
Well I thought that as well when I found it.  But my friend said it could be a braciopod, which is a shame if it i.  I have shown it to a geology prof, even he had no idea.

ScouseMouse
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dinogary
is your line possibly part of a crinoid??
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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TqB
The line looks like a row of fish palatal teeth - no trilobites at Swanage!
 

The large brown bit might be bone too.
Tarquin
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dinogary
tqb-- what age are rock there?
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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TqB
dinogary - it's Cretaceous (Weald - Lower Greensand - see "locations"!)
Tarquin
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dinogary
ah should of looked at locations first Ermm
Growing old is compulsory, Growing up is optional!
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rab7ies
i should have read up on swanage(i didnt even know where it was let alone how old! lol)
down amongst the stones.
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rab7ies
so are these palatal teeth?pat2_001.JPG 
down amongst the stones.
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Naze Dave
Hi Scouse
I'd agree with teeth and bone, i love Durlston.

Rab, i dont think it is, yours looks like an impression of something to me.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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rab7ies
thanks dave.
down amongst the stones.
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TqB
Rab, any chance of a closeup? - I agree with Dave but can't work it out, something echinoderm perhaps?
Tarquin
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rab7ies
cheers tqb will sort one out now.
down amongst the stones.
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ThomasM


It almost looks like a starfish arm - closer pics will confirm.





Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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rab7ies
thanks thomas unfortunately im having real problems taking a closer pic but will try to sort it out(im camera illiterate!)
down amongst the stones.
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Anthony Rybak
I am not sure about the dimensions, but the 'teeth' look like scolecodont teeth.
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ryanc
rab7ies wrote:
thanks thomas unfortunately im having real problems taking a closer pic but will try to sort it out(im camera illiterate!)


 

If you have a magnifying glass you can try holding that in front of the lens?

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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gigantopithicus
 That to me looks like some form of echinoderm in flint, and if so not part of the weald or lower greensand, as far as im aware there isnt flint in either?

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Bill G
I have adjusted the pic' as best I can for you Rab. It looks like a brittlestar or starfish arm to me too.

 

pat2_0011.jpg  
Cheers, Bill
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rab7ies
my first thought was echinoderm and it is flint and is most likely to be a glacial flow fossil as was found where i find all my flint echinoids.unfortunately cannot seem to get close up but will keep trying..thanks everyone!
down amongst the stones.
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rab7ies
cheers bill...i was posting at the same time as you! haha...thanks cos i couldnt sort better pic!!
down amongst the stones.
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rab7ies
this is the only other asteroid ive found(hopefully?)so well chuffed...cheers everyone. in_003.JPG 
down amongst the stones.
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Bill G
I think that's an imprint of the ambulacra of an echinoid.
Cheers, Bill
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rab7ies
lol...thought i had got an almost whole starfish! doh!! thanks bill
down amongst the stones.
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Richard
Re: the photo enlarged by Bill of starfish arm? 

Might it be an echinoid ambulacrum i.e. a row of tubercles with the mamelons eroded away? 




Richard
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scousemouse
Thanks all for your help, well I am pleased that none of you have said its just a natural occurrence.

Ta


ScouseMouse
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TqB
The tubercles are too close for most of the echinoids I can find pictures of - Tetragramma perhaps?, but then they should be double. Over to the Chalk/flint experts...
Tarquin
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rab7ies
thanks tqb...regulars are rare from where this came from.
down amongst the stones.
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rab7ies
ah thought you were talking about second pic not first one tqb(tho i get confused alot) and that looks pretty close bill.
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TqB

My fault Rab, the second is definitely an irregular, hope the first is a starfish!

Tarquin
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rab7ies
thanks..me too!
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