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Elbert

Hello, Andy you are right, my publication is outdated...

For the one loose ammonite; Hildaites?


greetings, Bert

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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deltapodus
Taking advantage of the warmer weather  I decided I really ought to go and sort out the boxes in the garage, label them with locality, date etc, and arrange in a more sensible order  - all the Whitby bits together kind of thing. Anyhow, I found a few things that I didn't know I had, or forgotten about.

Funny, I thought I'd never found aptychi until March last year. As I sorted bits out today, I came across this slab that came from a fallen block in Runswick Bay about fifteen years ago. Turns out there are three or four aptychi in there. I'd appreciate help with the id on this one. Am I right in thinking it's alum shale from the orange crystals on the edge? There's a partial Dac in there, but I'm not sure whether the other ammonites (over 40 in there), are Harpoceras, Cleviceras, or Eleganticeras. I haven't worked out how to tell the difference yet. Main piece 1st, counterpart 2nd.
Runswick_slab.jpg 
Runswick_counter.jpg 

The edge of the piece
Runswick_alum.jpg 

Close up of the Dac
Runswick_Dac.jpg 

Group shot, with a close up of one  of the larger ammos, and, last, the anaptychus.
Runswick_ammo_2.jpg 
Runswick_ammo.jpg 
Runswick_aptychi_2.jpg 

All these years, I thought I'd never found aptychi, yet I had them in the garage all along and looked at this block many times.   Ah, well, guess that what getting your eye means.
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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deltapodus
Some more garage bits. 

From Jump Down Bight. Hildoceras bifrons?
Jump_Down_Bight.jpg 

From the Whitby plant beds - a fallen block in the area where you see the top of the Dogger.
I confess I have no idea where this is fern, cycad or something else. Or what the large single leaf is.
Whitby_plants.jpg 

A crinoid from Stoupe Beck, found loose again.
stoupe_Beck_crinoid.jpg 

A close up
stoupe_Beck_crinoid_2.jpg 

Finally, this one was brought to me by a friend who worked at the neighbouring school. The locality is  Pit Hill, in Holmewood, Bradford. I know it's a horsetail, and presumably Carboniferous. The set square is about 9cm long so that should give you some idea of the size of this. 

horsetail.jpg 

Is there anyone on this forum who has a thing for plants of this age?

Finally found bone[biggrin]
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Elbert

Hello, the slab on the first photo looks like a piece of bed 32, the lowermost of the Yetrock...

For the plants; there is a recent book about the plants of the Yorkshire jurassic, from the Palaeontological Association, ISBN 0-901702-64-1 , this could give you a lot of the answers you are looking for...

greetings, Bert

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Welsh Wizard
Nice fern. It's something like zamites gigas, but I'd have to check.

Nick
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, then you're probably right".......Henry Ford
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deltapodus
Thanks for the answers. I had wondered if it was Zamites. 
I've got that book on the plants and the 5 volume Yorkshire Jurassic Flora. Trouble is, when it comes to plants, I really don't know how to compare what I see to what the book describes. I could do with one of these keys - if it looks this, turn to 2, if that, go to 4. You know the kind of thing? I find both books require you to have a good idea of what you have before you try and use for id.

Any idea of which genus the ammonites are? 

And the horsetail? Not having any interest in Carboniferous stuff, I would be willing to let it go, if anyone is interested.
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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AndyS
I see at least 3 ammonites with a rounded umbilical wall on that slab - which makes them Tiltoniceras antiquum (and not from the jetrock).

AndyS

Visit my liassic ammonites (+ other fossils) blog at andysfossils.com
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AndyS
... Bed 32 is indeed correct, but it is the last bed of the grey shales, semicelatum subzone (which makes the Dac fragment D. Semicelatum)
Visit my liassic ammonites (+ other fossils) blog at andysfossils.com
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deltapodus
Thanks, Andy, Tiltoniceras antiquum it is. I wondered if that was the case when bed 32 was mentioned. So, another surprise there, I've had Tiltoniceras all along and not known it. So, a couple more questions, Cleviceras and Eleganticeras are jet rock, then, if I've understood it right? Is there any significance to the crystals on the edge of the slab, as in  indicating whether it's grey shales, jet rock, or, indeed, alum shale?
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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deltapodus
Thanks, Bert, I hadn't considered Hildaites: I understood they are relatively rare, so I looked at the more common ones first, and just thought Hildoceras. One thing I am realising, I clearly need to learn how to distinguish one ammonite from another. While I can spot the difference between, say, a Dactylioceras, a Harpoceras, and a Peronoceras, I struggle with things like Tiltoniceras, Cleviceras, and Eleganticeras. I seriously need to read those books of Howarth's that I've managed to pick up.
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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