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denis 1
Diag.jpg  eotyrannus_footprint_Folkestone_2018 (50 of 61)_preview.jpeg Footprint Number one on the trackway.
Only Me
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Gary W
I have seen these supposed footprints and I really doubt they were made by dinosaurs.
Firstly the folkestone beds (which lie just below the gault clay) were marine and  were laid down in quite deep water, far too deep for a dinosaur to walk on  the sea bed. 

I can see what you are proposing is  a footprint but the line of the lower right 'toe' carries on well behind the 'footprint' to the left, in exactly the same alignment.

What we are looking at is a bioturbed sea floor surface and various marks and lines seem to occasionally lie in  a three line arrangement and give the mistaken impression that they were made by a dinosaur.
Gary
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prep01
I'm afraid I agree with Gary!
Colin Huller
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denis 1
20200212_101741[2] (1).jpg This has been authenticated by the Natural history museum experts.
Only Me
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Gary W
Sorry but I have been through this discussion before, it may have been identified by a museum but unfortunately museums are not always correct.
For instance a friend of mine once took a took a Turrilites Ammonite to the BMNH and they said it was a gastropod, 
The new photo you are showing is just a block of rock that has a passing resemblance to a footprint.
Many different strata will provide similar pseudofossils but a true footprint is very obvious, like this one from Glen Rose Texas.

DSCF0906.jpg 
Gary
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denis 1
 Then please explain why there is a type of bubbler crab sand casts in lower greensands at Folkestone? They can not be formed in a shallow sea. also, not all footprints are absolutely perfect.
Only Me
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Paleoworld-101
My masters research project is on dinosaur tracks so i felt compelled to chime in. I agree with Gary that your specimens are not convincing, as Gary pointed out, the impression of digit II (following your trackway diagram, "track 1" is a left print) extends back past what would be the posterior end of the track, and digit IV shows a terminal 'claw mark' that is too straight and almost looks like a man-made cut mark. I'm not saying it is, but that's what it looks like, too straight and perfect for an actual claw mark. If you want further assessment i'd suggest posting photos of the other "tracks" in the sequence. But from the one pictured i would say not a footprint. 
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tc
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... a friend of mine once took a took a Turrilites Ammonite to the BMNH and they said it was a gastropod


Some of the 'Turrelites' on display in the Sedgwick museum in Cambridge clearly aren't ammonites either. Something about them seems to confuse academics.
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Gary W
Just to clarify it was the opposite for my friend who definitely had a turrilites (you could see the sutures) the museum said it was a gastropod! 
Gary
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