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Darren0020
Again we had lots of fun, found lots of belemnite fragment, a really nice little ammonite, and lots of fragments, lots of crinoid stems and maybe the top /flower and one or two things I am not sure of.

IMG_20200902_192958.jpg  piddock burrows?
   IMG_20200902_191819.jpg  don't know what this is IMG_20200902_191741.jpg  crinoids IMG_20200902_191641.jpg  Belemnites IMG_20200902_191516.jpg  ammonite and fragments IMG_20200902_185957.jpg  crinoid flower? IMG_20200902_185854.jpg  cool IMG_20200902_185526.jpg  my nice ammonite
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Gary W
I think the second photo is a water worn coral, I am guessing these come from Yorkshire? As most of your fossils are fro  the Lias, but the coral is from the Carboniferous Limestone and probably carried down from further north during the ice age.
Gary
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Darren0020
IMG_20200902_192228.jpg  IMG_20200902_185329__01.jpg not sure what these are either.
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Gary W
The first of the new photos are crinoid ossicles, not too sure of the second, may also bee crinoid ossicle but may be something man made.
Gary
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Barrow Museum
Hi!
An interesting and varied assortment.
I have a suspicion that your "Piddock burrows" may be rather older.  Looks like they may be bivalve borings dating back rather to the Jurassic, though in what?  Possibly a limestone or phosphate stone fragment incorporated in a Jurassic sediment.  At first glance, it resembles a crocodile scute (the dermal bones on the back) but this I doubt.  Photos of the back and sides would help to dispel the idea.  Depending upon what it looks like from different angles, it will probably end up being classified as a chunk of bubbly industrial slag but I hope I am wrong!

As Gary has pointed out and I am sure you know you have a lot of crinoid fragments and bits of Lias ammonites, many of which resemble fragments of Arnioceras.

Your "nice ammonite" is a Cardioceras (probably the subgenus Scarburgiceras) from the Oxford Clay.
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Narlgoth
That first pic puts me in mind of a coral stone where the fossilized coral has eroded faster then the surrounding matrix. Probably not what it is though! Just what it reminds me of.. I am not good with identifying things with holes! Ã°Å¸â€™ÂÃ¢â‚¬ÂÃ¢â„¢â€šÃ¯Â¸Â

Its interesting that the holes kind of fade off to the right side into what looks almost like honeycomb. Where is this rock from? Some of the other stuff looks Yorkshire, although if it came from Hornsea it could have been from nearly anywhere due to the glacial till.
- Brad
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Darren0020
They all came from Mapleton beach yesterday, I will clean up the first one when I get home from work and post some more pictures of it, almost every time I turned over some stones I found a crinoid stem or a belemnite fragment, was a great day 🙂
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Narlgoth
Honestly we find most days like that. We've had little reason to use tools a lot of the time, if you aren't picky you can find tons of stuff by just looking through the beach scree!
- Brad
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Darren0020
IMG_20200903_170700.jpg  IMG_20200903_170636.jpg  IMG_20200903_170536.jpg 
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prep01
Hello Darren, I assume that these latest photos are also from Mappleton, which incase you didn't know is all glacial deposits from anywhere North of the location and contains 'debriis' from several eras, so it isn't easy to give accurate ID's.The other one looks like a very worn piece of Carboniferous limestone containing small corals 300 - 400 million years old.
Colin Huller
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