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GB18278393918
This fossil(?) was found amongst a scree pile in an abandoned quarry in Matlock. I have found several crinoids, brachiopods and bivalves in the area, however this appears to be something different. It is much larger than any other fossils I have found in this area. It is very circular, and seems to have three bands of circular rock across its cross section.
It has a thin layer of rock (~0.5) around the edge of the fossil, a layer ~3cm which has eroded the most. Then a central rock with a diameter of 6cm, which protrudes from the rock.
I was wondering whether it could be a unusually large crinoid, fossilised tree trunk, circular rock drilled out as a sample for the quarrying, or something else entirely!
Any help with identifying this fossil/rock would be appreciated.
Thanks. 39926966_2221112044788634_4142349374053154816_n.jpg  39878746_223748341655472_2032305166425784320_n.jpg  39917085_242269579765435_2391402266738294784_n.jpg  39900621_259134884729483_341679491803774976_n.jpg  39569991_314337472461173_148638419998736384_n.jpg
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GB18278393918
As mentioned it is cylindrical, but not perfectly circular. So I wondered if this suggested it is a fossil not a quarry rock sample.
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TqB
It looks as if it tapers in which case I think it might be a weathered piece of a large orthocone nautiloid such as Rayonnoceras.  
The bulge at one end may be due to the large siphuncle, the other end showing a section through the living chamber.

The thin outside layer could be the shell.
Tarquin
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CurtKnap
I agree with Tarquin's diagnosis.
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GB18278393918
Great! Thank you very much for identifying it Tarquin & CurtKnap! I managed to find another piece of the fossil.

This new piece, connects to the top of the original fossil and must have been broken off. The below image shows the fossils joined together. 
6.jpg 
The below images show the fossils as the separate pieces.
 7.jpg 
8.jpg 
9.jpg 
Would this new find confirm the fossil is a Rayonnoceras? I was also wondering whether this has the possibility of being a new species, as I'm not aware of any other nautiloids, like this one, which have been found in the eyam limestone area?

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TqB
Well done! I don't think it helps the ID any more but Rayonnoceras is still likely. Proper ID would need you to do a longitudinal section of part of it!

Nautiloids occur in the Monsal Dale Limestones but I don't know any more than that about ones from that area.

Large orthocones, probably the same genus, are a rare element in the similar aged (Brigantian/lower Namurian) limestones in my area (Co. Durham) - I've seen four in twenty years... 




Tarquin
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GB18278393918
Ok thanks! Ill have a look into having a longitudinal section taken to identify it. Wow, I will try and find more of the fossil then. I collected many small fragments of the shell, which im attempting to piece back together.
Thanks for all the help
GB
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