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patrick 112
I have a fossil, which I can not identify. 
One of my teachers used to be a fossil hunter he knows what he's talking about and he's quite sure its the bones of something, maby ribs. 

I found it on bath hill overlooking bassenthrwait lake in the lake district.
its got 2 big streaks about 1.5cm wide and 10 cm long. and one small streak about 0.5cm wide and 3 cm long. Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0776 2.jpg, Views: 49, Size: 1.86 MB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0777 2.jpg, Views: 57, Size: 1.67 MB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0779 2.jpg, Views: 57, Size: 2.14 MB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_1017.jpg, Views: 53, Size: 1.47 MB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_1018.jpg, Views: 47, Size: 1.57 MB
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum Patrick.
I have enlarged and tweaked your photos, but I am not able to see anything that says 'bone'. Could you tell me a) if it is definately a piece of bedrock and b) does the cross section look like 'honecombe' ?
Colin Huller
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patrick 112
Thankyou 

No its cross section does not look like honey comb. I found it ontop of a mountain called bath hill in the lake district. 

I went to where I found it on an online geology map and this is what it said. If this helps 

1:50 000 scale bedrock geology description: Kirk Stile Formation - Mudstone And Siltstone. Sedimentary Bedrock formed approximately 458 to 478 million years ago in the Ordovician Period. Local environment previously dominated by deep seas.

Setting: deep seas. These sedimentary rocks are marine in origin. They are detrital and comprise coarse- to fine-grained slurries of debris from the continental shelf flowing into a deep-sea environment, forming distinctively graded beds.
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patrick 112
I am not a full geologist yet but my teacher says this about that fossil,

It’s in shale and hasn’t gone black, which as a rough rule of thumb suggests it not plant material. The well defined edges and distinct colour change would suggest bone; and it looks rib like. It certainly isn’t coral, nor is it molluscan. Equally the specimen is small(ISH) so it’s difficult to be precise.


 
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prep01
Hi Partick, I also use that online map and on my smartphone! I'm pretty certain it's not bone fro the photos. I think it's more likely to be a marine burrow, but to be certain I would lake it to a museum for a 'hands - on examination. You might want to try Woodhorn Museu in Ashington.
Remamber, if it was found loose it could have been moved from the North by a glacier.
Colin Huller
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Vert Finder
I agree, not bone.
Thanks, VF
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Chalkers
I'm not familiar with the geology but if you type in 'flute and groove casts' into google you may get some images that look similar to your find. The description of the geological setting you posted of 'slurries of debris flowing from the continental shelf to the deep sea' made me think that this is what you may have found.
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cinders
I agree that this is likely to be flute casts which are caused by sediment flowing down a slope on the sea bed. They are particularly common in rocks of this age and from this area. It's definitely not a fossil.
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patrick 112
thank you

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patrick 112
but surely if it was a flute cast it should be the same type of rock as the surrounding rock but it is not. 
I found this out from 5 minutes on the internet seeing what a flute cast is. 

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FossilPhil
Hi Patrick,
One thing to remember - flute marks are erosive. Hence, the infill of these flutes may be different to the sediment that was scoured (IE the infill will be coarser).
Therefore, if the split is not perfectly along the erosive interface, remaining sediment may sit between the flute casts, giving the appearance that the flute cast is different from the surrounding rock.
No large bones are found in the Ordovician, that I know of, at least, so it almost certainly isn't that. Other possibility is bioturbation (again probably not likely, from the environmental conditions).
My money is still on flute cast.
-Phil
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patrick 112
Ok thank you . so flute casts are just solid sand ripples like in this picture.  
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Neil Clark
Hi Patrick,

The Kirk Stile Formation is part of the Skiddaw Group of rocks and has been folded and metamorphosed in some places. I couldn't find Bath Hill on my maps, but the image you have looks like a piece of rock that has been slightly crumpled and perhaps metamorphosed. The shiny lustre and striations on the top surface suggest some recrystallisation and movement. The rocks of that area are difficult for finding fossils in, but there are some interesting fossils of trilobites and graptolites from the Skiddaw Group. Keep looking, I am sure you will find some fossils there eventually.


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