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DickoSWD

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Neogene Newbie
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Reply with quote  #1 
I have collected these from along Seaham's (in Durham) Blast Beach.  Most are carboniferous fossils which are from Dawdon Colliery's spoil heap.  However, the small glass example is different   20190131_105522.jpg  20190131_105501.jpg  20190131_105124.jpg  20190131_105038.jpg  20190131_105049.jpg  20190131_105105.jpg  20190131_105024.jpg
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estwing

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Could it be fluorite?
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Dirty Pete

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Reply with quote  #3 
Certainly looks like fluorite. The Permian rocks could have been the source, through which the mine/mines had to be sunk to reach the Coal Measures in the East.

Pete.

Nice plants by the way.
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DickoSWD

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Cheers for replies.  The coral fossil (last image) seems to be the hardest for my grand-kids to understand, they can't seem to grasp the shape of the coral in the deposit. The fluorite example was probably part of a geode as the matrix base has a natural curve to it - this one was an interesting find as I have never seen anything similar in the area.  

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Dirty Pete

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Reply with quote  #5 
Seems you were very lucky to find it according to this extract from On Fluorite and Other Minerals in Lower Permian Rocks of South Durham (A.Fowler):

Cores have been put down in South Durham in order to prove extensions of the Productive Coal Measures. In passing through the cover of Magnesian Limestone, here up to 300 feet thick, quite the most arresting feature was the presence of innumerable cavities of irregular distribution. These are especially characteristic of the Lower Limestones, and are of all sizes from tiny geodes almost completely infilled with calcite to gashes which cut deep into the heart of the 6 in. core. They are usually lined with calcite in a variety of forms; far more rarely there are other minerals among which fluorite and barytes seem to be the most abundant.

Don't lose it,

Pete
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