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prep01
The ones I had were acid prepped as you say with an 'open structure' and I didn't coat them and were fine for many years in the living room draw for about 10 years and were s**d last year in perfect condition.
Colin Huller
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Julian123
Hi Folks,

Made one of my best ever finds today
Need an ID please.
Ichthyosaur perhaps?

Firstly apologies - I cant give the location away. It's private land and part of the deal allowing me to collect is that I don't name the spot. It's in Wiltshire and the fossil was found in Jurassic clay / mud.

Interestingly an oyster is attached to one side.

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Julian

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prep01
Nice one Julian! What are the dimensions? Ichthyosaur but from experience, assuming it's Oxford clay, then Opthalmosaur would be probable.
Colin Huller
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Julian123
Sorry - dimensions added on this photo..
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Julian

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Welsh Wizard
Julian

Nice find.

I agree with Colin but can't help any further.

It looks well preserved but I guess with an oyster attached, it was probably rattling around on the sea floor prior to burial. There could be more present as we once found a disarticulated ichthyosaur skull with an oyster attached.

All the best

Nick
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, then you're probably right".......Henry Ford
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Koss1959
Looks ichthyosaur. Looks like it's from the neck, where the verts are smallest. She was obviously a big'un.
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Julian123
Thanks for the info chaps. So an Opthalmosaur is a type of Ichthy?
Julian

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Jurassic Jim
The vertebra is actually a caudal vertebra (think around the waist), due to the rib positioning at the bottom of the centrum.  This would be about the biggest vertebra in the ichthyosaur.
James
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Koss1959
Ah. I got them the wrong way round. Still learning. Either way, nice find.
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prep01
Hi Julian,"Thanks for the info chaps. So an Opthalmosaur is a type of Ichthy?"                                 Yes, see link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophthalmosaurus
Colin Huller
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Julian123
I thought so Colin but I confused when you said " Ichthyosaur but from experience, assuming it's Oxford clay, then Opthalmosaur would be probable." which seemed to mean you thought it looked like Ichthy but from experience you thought it was in fact Opthalmosaur.
I see now you meant it looks like some kind of Ichthy and from experience you think it is more precisely Opthalmosaur.
Now it has dried it looks very open grained - perhaps a soak in PVA is needed?
Julian

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prep01
Julian, I personally don't 'coat' fossils unless it's necessary and then I usually use Paraloid which is reversible.

Edited by prep01 2014-08-10 16:53:22
Colin Huller
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ophthalmosaur

Hi Julian,

Nice find. Is that from the Kimmeridge Clay?

Paul
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Julian123
To be honest I have no idea what clay it's from.
Colin - I didnt want to coat it but am worried it may break up - what do you think?
Julian

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