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Jacob Jolly
Hi guys,

I'm very new to the Fossick / Fossil Hunting world so my wife and I went fossil hunting in Lyme Regis the other day. We saw some awesome fossils in the larger rocks but nothing in smaller rock of significance. I did however find these weird heavy rocks. They seem to be (to my untrained eye) some sort of metal due to the 'chink' noise they make when hitting them with metal. They are quite heavy for the size I feel and kind of look like oxidization as if they were made of iron. A few of them, specifically one of them literally just looks like poo clumps and is super smooth, while one of the others has crazy square spikey points all over it as if it were a crystal clump or something. You can kind of get a picture of the size of these from my hand but for ref they are ranging from 1cm up to 5ish cm in size.

I'm struggling to work out what the hell they are and any help would be massively appreciated.

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Dirty Pete
Reckon your eye is far from untrained, look like iron oxide/disulphide nodules to me.

Pete
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prep01
Yes. they are all nodules of varieties of Pyrite which formed around organic debris, some around fossils. There is lots of information online, especially slowwing down prite decay.
Colin Huller
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Jacob Jolly
Thanks for the speedy reply guys! I'm both excited and disappointed that they're Iron Oxide 😃 I just have another question though from what you said Colin, how do you mean Pyrite Decay? Does that mean they will decay over a period of time?

Thanks again
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Dirty Pete
Hi again,
Its the iron disulphide (pyrite) that breaks down in the presence of air and water......(pyrite+oxygen+water) >>(ferrous sulphate+sulphuric acid,sulphur dioxide).

Pete
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Rolo
This stuff does vary in the rate of decay though, some lasts for years whilst other seemingly identical nodules will begin to disintegrate within weeks.
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Chris G
My wife is a junior teacher and whenever we can we collect these, especially the bigger cricket ball shaped ones. Give the youngsters a hammer and let them crack them open. The beautiful radiating silver rays give an instant reward and the youngsters are fascinated by what they've discovered. Luckily they move on to something else before they start to decay.
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