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Kam
Hi everyone. 

Went on a long walk along the beach in Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex and found few interesting looking items. Hoping someone will have any idea what those might be. 

1a.jpg  1b.jpg  2a.jpg  2b.jpg  tooth1.jpg  tooth2.jpg
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MicroFossilMan
I've never been to that neck of the woods, so I'm guessing here ...

1. It looks a bit vertebra-ish! But that really is a long shot.

2. Nothing special I would say, just a rock that's been bored by modern critters.

3. A badly worn belemnite??? Or just a flint with a hole in it?
MFM
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Unregistered
1 is a pyritised and worn fossil shark vertebra, not a bad size for Walton!

2 is a derived flint sponge, probably from the glacial gravels at the top of the cliff.

3? No idea, could be another flint sponge, or a flint pseudofossil.

Dave
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Brittle Star
Hi
Could 1 and 2 be wood related, I know it looks at first glance to be like a vert but not seen one eroded like that.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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prep01
Hello Kam and welcome to the forum.
I also assume photos 1 & 2 are different views of the same fossil (well done). It is so heavily Pyritised and broken and although it does look a bit like a vertebra, I think it's far more likely to be a bit of twig.
3 & 4 I agree looks like bored coral / bryozooan / sponge.
5 & 6 does look like a belemnite but not sure. Can you scratch it with a 'copper' coin?
Colin Huller
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Kam
Thanks for all replies.

Colin - it produces a fine powder when scratched with a coin. Is that what you are looking for?


20180828_180154.jpg 

What do you think of that?[smile]
walnut1.jpg  walnut2.jpg 
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Dirty Pete
Plant that one it might grow into a peach tree.
Pete
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prep01
Hi again Kam, that confirms that it is Calcite and so a belemnite. If it had been flint it could not have been scratched with something steel
I agree - peach stone
Colin Huller
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Kam
Hi Colin. Thanks for confirming. Glad I found this forum, you guys seem very helpful. Off to Herne Bay, Kent this weekend, see what can be found there [smile]

Pete - I was thinking the same, plant it and see if it grows into a fossil peach tree [cool]
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Rolo
Surely the Naze is Tertiary? I don't think belemnites were around, a worn modern crab claw would seem possible.
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prep01
Hi Rolo, you may be right but in this day and age, 'derived' could have been dropped, sea born, gravel lorry, etc, etc so anything is possible!!!!
Colin Huller
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Gerald Gibson
Since fossil stromatolites are found in Essex, England, your "acorn" might be a fossil stromatolite.  However, the fossil stromatolites of this area are marble-like.  If that was a fossil acorn, it wouldn't have that ragged look to it.  How large is it?  Stromatolite fossils are really quite large.  Typical fossil stromatolites are shown in attached link.

---- Gerald Gibson


Click image for larger version - Name: Stromatolites.jpg, Views: 13, Size: 257.13 KB
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prep01
Hello Gerald. I'm afraid you have lost me! Where in this post is there a reference to 'acorn' and 'stromatolite' please?
Colin Huller
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Gerald Gibson
Sorry Prep01:

I was replying to Kam (#1) on the page.  In fact I hit Reply on top.  I had read about stromatolite fossils in Essex and, on whim, sent my input.  It may not even be correct. It was speculation, based upon my own discovery of early Cambrian stromatolites from Marble Mountain, California.  If they're small, I doubt if they're stromatolite fossils. 

You will note in Kam's post (#1) two photos with rulers beneath them.  The photo on the left has what appears very much to me as a drawing or painting of a acorn.  I should therefore have sent my reply to Kam.  My apologies to her, too.

It appears to me that Great Britain, like my own country, offers a great wealth and diversity of fossils.  Under the user name Phacops, I have contributed sixteen different times in the past, but have been away from my hobby for awhile.  I'm back!

Gerald Gibson (Phacops)
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Brittle Star
Hi, afraid you have lost me also, no idea what drawings on a ruler have to do with the photos of fossils. Clicking on reply is the correct response to answering a post.
Confused even more as not an acorn in sight.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Gerald Gibson
Prep01:

Please look at the attached screenshot of Kam's (#1 on page) post.  This should clarify matters.  I'm really not sure they are stromatolite fossils myself.  I don't know how my reply got mixed up with your post, but I'll be extra careful next time when I post!

Have a nice day!  ---- Phacops Click image for larger version - Name: Post.jpg, Views: 19, Size: 166.44 KB
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prep01
Gerald,these are almost certainly pyritised objects. I have not heard of stomatolites in the Eocene, so can you please post a link(s) to your articles / papers - thanks.
Colin Huller
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Gerald Gibson
Please note: I meant that they "looked" like fossil stromatolites, not that were "were".  I also showed doubt when I said the were probably too small.  The appearance of these fossils struck me as similar to my own finds and the top of the right hand photo has the swirl noticeable in living stromatolites as well as fossil ones.  I never said definitively that were actually stromatolites.  They had similarities to them; that's all. As far as your claim that they were pyritic fossils.  I've seen pyritic ammonites from Charmouth Bay and it seems doubtful to me that Kam's fossil is pyritic.  Look closely at its dark, ragged appearance.  There's no pyrites in that fossil.  I'm certain, however that the mysterious fossil will soon be identified by members of the forum

---- Phacops 
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