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MattDorset
Hey all,

Picked this up at Charmouth last week.

I have no idea whether it's a fossilised "something" (I like to think it's a cross section of a tree!) or just a weird rock formation.

If any of you could help out, I'd be grateful.

Cheers,
Matt Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190804_073706.jpg, Views: 74, Size: 470.41 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190804_073718.jpg, Views: 79, Size: 322.30 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190804_073726.jpg, Views: 64, Size: 356.86 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190804_073731.jpg, Views: 59, Size: 338.83 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190804_073757.jpg, Views: 56, Size: 347.79 KB
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Barrow Museum
It is a piece of a septarian concretion.  These formed when a patch of lime concentrated around something in the sediment (often a shell) a short distance below the seafloor, during the time of deposition of, in your case, the Lower Jurassic rocks at Charmouth.  These concretions shrank as they hardened and small cracks formed in their interior.  These filedl with mineral, which in your case will be calcite (lime).  You have a segment of one of these concretions which has fragmented after emerging from the cliff.  Because of the way they formed, it is not unusual for a decent, uncompressed fossil to be found inside them. though it may have a "crazy paving" appearance due to the changes that occurred in the concretion as it became more indurated.
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prep01
Sorry, I have to disagree with Barrow Museum. To me it looks like bone and possibly part of a vertebra of a marine reptile (?Ichthyosaur)
Colin Huller
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prep01
Firstly, welcome to the forum. I disagree with Barrow Museum, I think it's bone in a nodule, probably part of an Ichthyosaur vertebra.
Colin Huller
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Elbert
Hello, I think the first repliant is correct; there is no bone structure visible, just a thin calcite layer...

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Dirty Pete
I'm with Barrow on this one, pic 2 shows a triangular wedge of lime mud penetrating the crystalline calcite concretion on the right hand side. 

Pete
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