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NWebb
We found this fossil when exploring rockpools on the east coast of Scotland this morning... any ideas what we found?  Estimate each rock is about 10-15 cm64D70903-7F5B-4510-B3EB-19131F934220.jpeg 
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Gary W
I dont think it is a fossil though I can see how you might think it is.  Not sure what it is but may be manmade.
Gary
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Elbert
Hello, I think this is layered sandstone and between the sandy layers lies a minute layer of mineral rich sedimentation ; as the sandstone wethers, the minerals oxidise and turn dark.
So it is just erosion doing it`s thing.
But what a beautifull sight!

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Richard
They remind me of the bivalve Trigonia 
Richard
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Hughie Bruce
Eroding wooden posts/timbers?
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NWebb
Don’t think it is wooden timbers... solid rock/sandstone structure and part of a much larger rock base as we tried to see more removing the sand/seabed area. Pictures possibly don’t show well the raised curved structures, having looked into the Trigonia suggestion they do look very similar to this.  Really ignited both my sons interest in geology and fossils, so pleased that they found something so interesting 🙂 
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Gary W
I dont think it is a trigonia how hard was it.?  Did you digitout
Does look a bit like grains of wood in cross section 
Gary
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NWebb
It was very hard/solid and whilst it looks like square sections, it was all part of a much larger rock structure under the sand.  For that reason we were unable to remove any of it or dig it out.  It was right in at the foot of the cliff edge behind and surrounded by large boulders, initially it was only a small area that was exposed when we moved a couple of rocks, and we removed a layer of pebbles/sand to find it. It’s an area that is only exposed during a low tide. 
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Gary W
Thanks but I would still vote for some manmade structure.
Gary
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Gerald Gibson
This is definitely Trigonia.  I found tons of them in Silverado Canyon, Orange Co. California.  It is Middle Cretaceous.

Trigonia.png 

.Trigonia.pngTrigonia.png
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Anonymous
Could it be a bunch of myphorella ??
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estwing
Banded flint, maybe?

[banded-flint-dorling-kindersleyuig] 
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Dirty Pete
I'm with Bert, weathering sections through bedding/laminations. Each block seems to be separated by fractures which might explain the different orientations.

Pete. 
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