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Daxinomega
And how?  Been down to ringstead bay to have a look around and came across this. Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_133140.jpg, Views: 72, Size: 176.26 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_133130.jpg, Views: 82, Size: 175.55 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_133150.jpg, Views: 71, Size: 134.17 KB
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prep01
This is a nice probably complete irregular (heart) sea urchin incased in  flint 75 - 85 myo. Known as a 'derived' fossil this will have been transported from the chalk.
Colin Huller
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Gary W
I spent my childhood fossil collecting in local fields full of flint.  It is possible to break the flint sea urchin out by holding a chisel at right angles to the fossil about 2 cm away. A hard blow should with luck break the flint in half exposing the urchin. Then the flint can actualy be put back together so the urchin can be removed when you want.   (Wear eye protection when hitting flint). 
Gary
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Brittle Star
That is beautiful.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Daxinomega
Thanks again everyone for the information, it is a great find, my wife was in the rocks at lowish tide and saw it, I couldn't believe she found something this interesting just sat there.  Now, as it is my wife's find I don't fancy hitting it with anything, using my engraving tool (not air but as the obsession of hunting seems to be growing a compressor may be moving in soon) will take too long, I do have a rotary cutter that I would hope could cut through the flint, but before I try has anyone else had any luck with flint and a cutter? Also safety first I have got a proper mask to keep the dust out and a face shield. 
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prep01
Hi again, IMHO I would say firm taps with a hammer is better than anything - it may take a whike and not be successful, - let her do it!
Colin Huller
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Daxinomega
She's hitting it now lol
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Daxinomega
And.... Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190440.jpg, Views: 45, Size: 265.27 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190430.jpg, Views: 46, Size: 239.80 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190451.jpg, Views: 41, Size: 305.85 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190444.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 239.75 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190504.jpg, Views: 39, Size: 226.49 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190458.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 241.49 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190509.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 296.94 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20191015_190523.jpg, Views: 31, Size: 243.01 KB
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prep01
Well done - Micraster cortesdudinarium by the looks of it
Colin Huller
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Daxinomega
Colin, thanks for being so awesome, every post we have made you've given advice and warned, we are super happy to have you with us on our fossil adventures and to have the knowledge you share, it's truly amazing.  As soon as my wife heard me read what you said she was outside mining the fossil and she's really proud of what she has and I'm super proud lol. Thank you for all your advice! 
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Daxinomega
P.s. we may have googled you lol 
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prep01
Oh 'eck! Should I be worried?
Colin Huller
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Daxinomega
Lol I wouldn't worry at this point haha
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