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Brittle Star
Hi, When I was in Sandown earlier this year I took a few photos of the cliffs as I was walking along, didn't get very far as it tipped it down with rain.
Could anyone give me any information exactly what I took photos of as I have been totally unsuccessful in finding anything out on line.
I have tried to put them in order from the car park. I know, I think, that it is Wealdon but I do not know where the Wessex ends and the Vectis begins. Plus what beds are showing in the photos.
Thank you for any clues. I think a plant bed is showing but no idea which one. Click image for larger version - Name: series_1_Yaverland_June_2016_2.JPG, Views: 64, Size: 179.03 KB Click image for larger version - Name: series_2_Yaverland_June_2016_5.JPG, Views: 63, Size: 184.84 KB Click image for larger version - Name: series_3_Yaverland_June_2016_4.JPG, Views: 61, Size: 194.08 KB Click image for larger version - Name: series_4_Yaverland_June_2016_3.JPG, Views: 74, Size: 186.04 KB Click image for larger version - Name: series_5_Plant_debris_bed_1.JPG, Views: 66, Size: 234.05 KB Click image for larger version - Name: series_6_Plant_Debris_bed_2.JPG, Views: 68, Size: 262.38 KB
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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YVIE
Sorry I had S.O.S. call to work and missed the trip.Off to Cowes next week.
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Goldkaiser
having studied the Wealden for the last year I can tell you two important things in distinguishing the Wessex and Vectis. Firstly the Wessex is usually red in colour and in places can contain colour mottled appearance, within the Wessex is where the primarily studied plant Debris beds are studied at yarvaland I believe it is L38 and possibly L39 which is within that area among others however I would recommend reading the Wealden fossils PalAss book for more details. The beginning of the Vectis can be characterised by a sandy unit which contain lenses of mud and a high plant matter ratio; it is also highly bio turbaned and is very white; this is known as the white Sandrock and is the beginning of the Vectis. Looking at the pictures I would guess that the 4th pictures shows this in the right hand corner where a white bed overlays the red Wessex although this is only assumption and would need pictures of the white nans to confirm.
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Brittle Star
Thanks for that brilliant information, I have a close up of the bed that dips down to the beach. May be too close. Have attached it.
Could you let me know what you meant by 'pictures of the white nans'.

So you think the bed that is dipping down is maybe the Vectis, what bed would that be? Sorry to be so thick. Click image for larger version - Name: Plant_debris_bed_close_up.JPG, Views: 61, Size: 281.30 KB
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Goldkaiser
Sorry to clarify I meant the white bands that was auto correct oops [tongue]. What i am looking for is heavy bioturbation and clear cross beading. I will say you have clear plant debris material below the current hypothetical boundary. My study was mainly placed between grange chine and whales chine and their is a slight difference in geological inclination but the majority is similar enough to make assumptions. If this white layer is the White Sandrock you are looking at the bottom most vectis known as the chilton chine member. Below are a few examples of the White Sandrock Click image for larger version - Name: image.png, Views: 63, Size: 1.01 MB Click image for larger version - Name: image.png, Views: 59, Size: 637.32 KB
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Ammonite Jack 14

Hi, sorry it’s a few years late but for future hopefully it helps. 
All the photos you have taken are off the Wessex formation. Immediately arriving at yaverland that whole cliff section is the Wessex formation until you see a change in colour from reds, and mottled purples and blue-green to a more grey-black shale. The Wessex formation used to be called the Wealden Claus and the vectis the Wealden shales so its best to look for that distinction. The Wessex formation has lenses of blue-green thin bands packed with black carbonised fossil wood coming down to beach level and this is the main source of the dinosaur bone known as plant debris beds. When you notice the change in colour to a grey/black shale you have transitioned into the vectis where the bottom two members are relatively unfossiliferous and it is best to continue to the top member of the vectis known as the shepherds chine member. You will know when your there because there will be a whole series of hard limestone slabs at the base of the cliff on the beach full of the brachiopod Filosina gregaria and the Gastropod Viviparus. These are the best places to look in the vectis and you can find, Crocodile, turtle, fish, occasional dinosaur and Pterosaur but more often shark remains from Hybodus sharks. From here face the chalk and to your right about 100 metres in front of you and about three quarters of the way down the beach toward the tide line usually is a large accumulation of blocks of greensand. Within this some spectacular bivalves can be found and more rarely Ammonites such as Prodeshayesites. Yaverland is a great location to go to because of the very steep not to far off vertical succession you can walk the whole of the islands Cretaceous strata in just one kilometre all the way from the 130 million year old Wessex formation right through to the 70 million year old chalk. 

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tc
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...you can walk the whole of the islands Cretaceous strata in just one kilometre all the way from the 130 million year old Wessex formation right through to the 70 million year old chalk

A word to the wise, to avoid any sudden shocks to your system while on this walk be aware that the chalky area towards Culver is a nudist beach O.O
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